FPM Online Conference Series on Advances in Clinical Medicine: 3. Updates on Respiratory Medicine. 25 October 2021. 4pm UK time

Updates on Respiratory Medicine
25 Oct 4pm – 5pm UK time

Click here to register free for the webinar on EventBrite.

See Programme below

Flexibility and mobility of SARS-CoV-2-related protein structures
Prof Rudolf Römer, University of Warwick

Advances in Smoking Cessation
Professor Nick Hopkinson, Imperial College London;
Hon. Consultant Chest Physician, Royal Brompton Hospital

This session is organised by the Fellowship of Postgraduate Medicine, for which the official journals are the Postgraduate Medical Journal and Health Policy and Technology.

The FPM provide updates for clinical trainees, senior clinicians, policy makers, academics and other health professionals on prevention, diagnosis and treatment of common and serious clinical disorders – both for communicable and non-communicable diseases.

This session is organised by the Fellowship of Postgraduate Medicine in partnership with healthy heart charity the Cardiovascular Research Trust, with the Royal College of Physicians as online media partner.

This session is of interest to a wide range of professionals interested in health, including clinical trainees, senior clinicians, policy makers, academics and other health professionals. The session is also open to interested members of the public.

Programme

Chair
Prof Donald Singer, President, Fellowship of Postgraduate Medicine

4.00pm
Flexibility and mobility of SARS-CoV-2-related protein structures [see abstract and co-authors below]
Prof Rudolf Römer, University of Warwick

The worldwide CoVid-19 pandemic has led to an unprecedented push across the whole scientific community to develop potent antiviral drugs and vaccines as quick as possible. Existing academic, governmental and industrial institutions and companies have engaged in large-scale screening of existing drugs, in vitro, in vivo and in silico.

Prof Rudolf Römer will discuss in silico modelling of possible SARS-CoV-2 drug targets available in the Protein Databank to ascertain their dynamics, flexibility and rigidity. He will also discuss results for mutated variants of the virus spike protein and present results for the further, nearly 300 to date resolved SARS-CoV-2-related protein structures.

Q & A with audience

4.30pm
Advances in Smoking Cessation
Professor Nick Hopkinson, Imperial College London;
Hon. Consultant Chest Physician, Royal Brompton Hospital

Professor Hopkinson is Chair of Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) and serves on the Royal College of Physicians Tobacco Advisory Committee.

Work to prevent uptake of smoking and help smokers to quit is fundamental to addressing the burden of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease as well as other common and serious complications of smoking including impotence, heart attacks and stroke and many cancers. Highlighting rates of child uptake of smoking contributed to the adoption of measures on standardised packaging for tobacco products and the ban on smoking in cars with children. Professor Hopkinson’s collaborations include the FRESHAIR project promoting lung health in low and middle income countries and work on the global environmental impact of tobacco production and consumption.

Q & A with audience

Flexibility and mobility of SARS-CoV-2-related protein structures
R. A. Römer1*, N. S. Römer2, A. K. Wallis3, D Bellini4, J Panayis1
1Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL, UK (r.roemer@warwick.ac.uk); 2School of Life Sciences, University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool Campus, Lincoln, LN6 7TS, UK; 4MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QH, UK

ABSTRACT
The worldwide CoVid-19 pandemic has led to an unprecedented push across the whole scientific community to develop potent antiviral drugs and vaccines as quick as possible. Existing academic, governmental and industrial institutions and companies have engaged in large-scale screening of existing drugs, in vitro, in vivo and in silico. Here, we are using in silico modelling of possible SARS-CoV-2 drug targets available in the Protein Databank (PDB) to ascertain their dynamics, flexibility and rigidity. For example, for the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein—using its complete homo-trimer configuration with 2905 residues—our method identifies a large-scale opening and closing of the S1 subunit through movement of the SB domain (which is the domain that recognizes the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor). We have computed the full structural dynamics of this process, allowing for future docking studies with possible drug structures [1]. First results for the mutated variants of the spike protein will also be discussed. In a dedicated database, we present similarly detailed results for the further, nearly 300, thus far resolved SARS-CoV-2-related protein structures in the PDB.

1.  R. A. Römer, N. S. Römer, and A. K. Wallis, (2021) “Flexibility and mobility of SARS-CoV-2-related protein structures”, Sci. Rep. 11, 4257.

Biographies

Professor Nicholas Hopkinson MA PhD FRCP is based at The National Heart and Lung Institute of Imperial College on the Royal Brompton Hospital Campus. His research, which has been funded by the MRC, The NIHR, The Wellcome Trust, The British Lung Foundation and The Moulton Foundation, focuses on addressing exercise and activity limitation in COPD in areas including pulmonary physiology and lung volume reduction, skeletal muscle impairment and pulmonary rehabilitation.

He is active in tobacco control advocacy and is Chair of Action on Smoking and Health ASH(UK), as well as Medical Director of the British Lung Foundation.

Rudo Römer holds a professorial chair in the Department of Physics at the University of Warwick. He is a theoretical physicist and interested in a broad range of topics in condensed matter theory ranging from the mathematical physics of exactly solvable interacting quantum many-body systems to disordered quantum systems and the applications of computational physics to electronic transport in DNA as well as protein flexibility and dynamics. Römer is author of more than 180 scientific publications. He is Fellow of the Institute of Physics (UK), and holds a visiting professorship at Xiangtan University in China.

Donald Singer is President of the Fellowship of Postgraduate Medicine and chair of healthy heart charity the Cardiovascular Research Trust. He is a member of the Health Professionals Working Party of the European Medicines Agency and former Secretary of the European Association for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics. He has worked for the University of Yale and the St George’s  University Hospital London and has worked on medicine and patients safety as a pharmacologist within the 7 year Human Resources for Health programme in Rwanda, which aims to create a high quality national health system for the country. He was also foundation holder of the Chair of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics at the Graduate Medical School at Warwick University where he founded the Clinical Sciences Division in 2003. He is an active clinician with clinical interests in prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease and safe use of medicines. His main  research interests are in causes of vascular disease, better management of blood pressure and improved patient safety through new systems aimed at improving safety in prescribing. In 2009, with international poet Michael Hulse, he launched the annual International Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine, which has attracted interest from over 70 countries.

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